Conferences, presentations and workshops

“A reward for working in the fields and factories:” Canadian Women’s Suffrage Movement as portrayed in Ontario Texts´(“1916 to 2016 – A World of Changes: The Right to Vote, The Right to Fight, The Right to Care,” The Association for Canadian Studies (ACS) Conference and Journal (Fall, 2016) October 21-22, 2016.Winnipeg Manitoba

 

“Seeking out Signs of a Buried River: Incorporating Place-Based Student Investigations into Social Studies Curriculum” (The Manitoba Social Sciences Teachers’ Association conference) October 21st, 2016. Winnipeg MB

 

“History Curriculum in Schools: Sites of Gender Inequality,” CHEA/ACHÉ Conference, Waterloo, Ontario October 27-30th, 2016

“Teaching National Identity and Ideals of Citizenship: The First World War in Ontario Textbooks 1922-1952,” part of panel Educational practices: Opportunities to Loosen or Maintain state military narratives, Rose Fine-Meyer, Cate Duquette, Mary Chaktsiris, CHEA/ACHÉ Conference, Waterloo, Ontario October 27-30th, 2016

“Signs of a Buried River:  Place-Based History as a Method of Student Engagement in Post-Secondary History Education,” paper submitted to Historians Teaching History: What Works and What Needs Work?| One-day symposium, Mount Royal University, Calgary, Alberta, May 28, 2016

“Hypervisibility and Invisibility”: Oral Histories, Women, and Canadian Education” roundtable papers have been accepted for the Canadian Historical Association (CHA), Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, University Of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, May 29-June 5, 2016

Telling the story of Canadian Women from Exceptional to Everyday Life, Canadian Museum of History  Gatineau, QC
Thursday, October 15, 2015

http://canadashistory.ca/community/national-history-forum

Forum Poster

Upcoming Canada’s History Webinars

This 2015 fall webinar series will include a variety of topics in Canadian women’s history. We hope to start a conversation leading into the 8th Canada’s History Forum: Centennial of Women’s Suffrage, and continue the conversation as we move towards 2016. Join us in listening to these phenomenal presenters speak about prominent figures, moments, and places in Canada’s women’s history, as well as what has influenced the teaching of women’s history in the classroom and what it looks like today.

November

How Society Influences the Teaching of Women’s History in the Classroom by Rose Fine-Meyer
Wednesday, 4 November at 7:00 PM ETRegister for this webinar

Image of Rose Fine-MeyerDr. Rose Fine-Meyer teaches in the Masters of Teaching program at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto. Her research focuses on history education in Canada. She explores the relationships between provincially sanctioned curricula, teacher pedagogical practices, and place-based learning experiences, both in the past and in the present. She recently was honored by the OHS for her work as part of the OHFA, and as Guest Editor of a special edition of Ontario History. On a community level, she has developed and programmed a local women’s history talk series, herstoriescafe.com, that was recognized in 2012 with a Heritage Toronto’s Community Award. She is also the recipient of The Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal (2012) and The Governor General’s Award for Excellence in Teaching Canadian History (2007).

POWERPOINTS

Fine-Meyer LAURIER TALK April 2015 (2) INQUIRY PRACTICES

Fine-Meyer McGILL TALK JULY 2015 (2) RESEARCH WORK: PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE

Recent Conferences and Talks

  • “Was the Promise of Canadian Studies Fulfilled?: Examining the Inclusion of Diverse Voices in History Course Studies in Ontario Schools, 1970s-1990s,” Contesting Canada’s Future: An International Conference, Trent University, 21-23 May, 2015
  • “Seeking out non-combat war work narratives in history studies: the necessity for student engagement in interdisciplinary and collaborative research projects within local communities,” submission for Canadian Historical Association (CHA), Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, University Of Ottawa, May 30-June 3, 2015
  • “It takes a team:” Grassroots Organizations and Educational Communities Influencing  Curricular Change in Toronto classrooms, 1970-1990,” submission for Canadian Society for the Study in Education (CSSE), Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Ottawa, May 29-June 3, 2015.
  • Keynote speaker: Dr. Rose Fine-Meyer ” Are Tar sands as Canadian as canoes?: National Identity through the inquiry process and history education in schools”, Laurier University History Teachers Colloquium: Friday, April 17, 2015
  • “I played Phil Oaks and Dylan records:” War Resistance in Toronto Classrooms.” Paper, based on a forthcoming publication, Canadian History of Education Association (CHEA), Conference, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, October 23-26, 2014
  • “We cannot fight this war if we don’t eat” The Invisibility of war work in history textbooks in schools in Ontario.” ISCHE36 Education and War Conference at the Institute of Education, University of London, England July22-26, 2014
  • “Teaching War in the History Classroom: Challenging the Dominant Combat Narrative.” Workshop at Histories on the Edge/ The Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, University of Toronto, ON. May 22-25, 2014
  • “Situating Canadian War Resistance Within The Boundaries of Historical Inquiry” Roundtable: Congress of the Humanities and Social Science 2014, Brock University, May 25-30, 2014
  • National Judge: Canada’s History Society, Governor General History Awards for Excellence in Teaching, presentation November 18-19, 2013, November 1-4, 2014 Ottawa.